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Movie Review

Turn of the century Prince Edward Island creates a stunning visual backdrop for Anne of Green Gables, one of the finest examples of pure family entertainment ever produced for television. Extracted from the Lucy Maud Montgomery novels, the Anne of Green Gables story has inspired young fans--mostly girls--for nearly 15 years. Its appeal? Anne radiates an old fashioned, yet somehow entirely fresh confidence, courage and ambition rarely seen in modern films.

An orphan since infancy, the disarmingly precocious Anne arrives on-screen as a 12-year-old with fiery red hair (which she views as her own personal trial) and a tongue that never rests (which others see as their trial). To compensate for being passed over--and around--her whole life, she has fixed on a simple plan: Look for the best in everything. And if there isn't anything good, imagine it, then work to make it reality.

Placed in the home of elderly siblings Marilla and Matthew, Anne, for the first time in her life, receives unconditional love. And with that love comes instruction and discipline. Lessons learned include respect for elders, submission, forgiveness and godliness. Marilla even models the value of prayer and a consistent walk with God, stating, "God does not want you for a fair-weather friend."

As Anne grows and matures into an elegant young lady, she forges a cherished friendship with a neighbor girl, works hard to succeed at her academic ventures, learns that wealth doesn't ensure happiness and masters responsibility (on one occasion her thoughtfulness and presence of mind save the life of her friend's baby sister).

Anne of Green Gables has proven itself an endearing epic, beautifully acted and scripted without a single moral flaw. And while some adolescent boys may dismiss it as unmanly, they would do well to reconsider. Available on home video along with its sequel, Anne of Avonlea, this three-hour saga is a rare family treasure.

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Cast

Megan Follows, Colleen Dewhurst, Richard Farnsworth, Patricia Hamilton, David Hughes

Director

Kevin Sullivan ( )

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Reviewer

Steven Isaac

We hope this review was both interesting and useful. Please share it with family and friends who would benefit from it as well.

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